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December 2015 Edition

IN-Person Report: My Experience at Ball State's Economic Development Course

by Stefan Barkow | Mar 11, 2015
In mid-January, I was in Muncie, Indiana attending a one-week intensive course at Ball State University with just over 80 other professionals. My fellow students included mayors, county commissioners, community developers, business representatives and others from across the state—and even a number from outside of Indiana.

In mid-January, I was in Muncie, Indiana attending a one-week intensive course at Ball State University with just over 80 other professionals. My fellow students included mayors, county commissioners, community developers, business representatives and others from across the state—and even a number from outside of Indiana.

The program was the “Indiana Economic Development Course,” organized and operated by Ball State’s Building Better Communities group. For five days we spent nearly eleven hours a day hearing from, talking to and working with experts and professionals. At the same time, daily rotating seating assignments encouraged us to build connections across communities and across states as we studied the latest trends, practices and innovations in the field of economic development.

This course is one of only a few like it offered in the United States, which is why there were students hailing from Ohio, Kentucky, Illinois and Tennessee present.

The course is offered annually and sees significant support from companies such as NIPSCO, which provide scholarships and grants. The one-week course is accredited by theInternational Economic Development Council and fulfills one of the prerequisites for those on the path to attaining the Certified Economic Developer (CEcD) designation.

Our days were broken into blocks in which we heard from and discussed every aspect of economic development with focuses on both small rural areas as well as major metropolitans.

Sessions included:

  • Economic development organization management
  • Professional ethics
  • Marketing and business attraction
  • Strategic planning
  • Profiling and analyzing local economies
  • Workforce development
  • Finance tools and strategies for economic development
  • Business retention and expansion
  • Community and neighborhood development
  • Site selection, presented by a professional site selector
  • Real estate development and reuse
  • Small business and entrepreneurship development

Although they were great about providing breaks so that we weren’t overwhelmed, even the provided lunches included presenters, including the Indiana Office of Community and Rural Affairs Director of Project Development Geoff Schomaker and Indiana Economic Development Corporation President Eric Doden discussing the proposed Regional Cities approach to economic development.

One day we were divided into teams of communities and companies and tasked with respectively attracting and selecting a site for an expanding business. This in itself was a flurry of adrenaline and activity, but also gave everyone involved a new perspective on how much work and how many considerations go into major decisions such as these.

Above it all, beyond the terrific amount of knowledge and experience provided throughout the week for all of us to learn from, I think one of the most valuable aspects—and one that has set Indiana apart via approaches such as this—is not only the open forum learning environment approach that lets our burgeoning professionals connect with each other, but the large number of attendees whose titles were only tangentially related to the strict, traditional titles of economic developers.

One of Indiana’s strengths the state is looking to hone is our interconnectedness. So many people across the state are passionate enough to want to educate themselves so that we are all prepared to support the growth and expansion of the state’s communities. Events such as Ball State University’s course not only prepare professional students through education, they also build bridges of communication and collaboration between professionals young and old that will be shaping the future of the state for years to come.

Ball State University
Building Better Communities
http://cms.bsu.edu/about/administrativeoffices/bbc

Ball State Economic Development Course

November 2015 Edition

IN-Person Report: My Experience at Ball State's Economic Development Course

by Stefan Barkow | Mar 11, 2015
In mid-January, I was in Muncie, Indiana attending a one-week intensive course at Ball State University with just over 80 other professionals. My fellow students included mayors, county commissioners, community developers, business representatives and others from across the state—and even a number from outside of Indiana.

In mid-January, I was in Muncie, Indiana attending a one-week intensive course at Ball State University with just over 80 other professionals. My fellow students included mayors, county commissioners, community developers, business representatives and others from across the state—and even a number from outside of Indiana.

The program was the “Indiana Economic Development Course,” organized and operated by Ball State’s Building Better Communities group. For five days we spent nearly eleven hours a day hearing from, talking to and working with experts and professionals. At the same time, daily rotating seating assignments encouraged us to build connections across communities and across states as we studied the latest trends, practices and innovations in the field of economic development.

This course is one of only a few like it offered in the United States, which is why there were students hailing from Ohio, Kentucky, Illinois and Tennessee present.

The course is offered annually and sees significant support from companies such as NIPSCO, which provide scholarships and grants. The one-week course is accredited by theInternational Economic Development Council and fulfills one of the prerequisites for those on the path to attaining the Certified Economic Developer (CEcD) designation.

Our days were broken into blocks in which we heard from and discussed every aspect of economic development with focuses on both small rural areas as well as major metropolitans.

Sessions included:

  • Economic development organization management
  • Professional ethics
  • Marketing and business attraction
  • Strategic planning
  • Profiling and analyzing local economies
  • Workforce development
  • Finance tools and strategies for economic development
  • Business retention and expansion
  • Community and neighborhood development
  • Site selection, presented by a professional site selector
  • Real estate development and reuse
  • Small business and entrepreneurship development

Although they were great about providing breaks so that we weren’t overwhelmed, even the provided lunches included presenters, including the Indiana Office of Community and Rural Affairs Director of Project Development Geoff Schomaker and Indiana Economic Development Corporation President Eric Doden discussing the proposed Regional Cities approach to economic development.

One day we were divided into teams of communities and companies and tasked with respectively attracting and selecting a site for an expanding business. This in itself was a flurry of adrenaline and activity, but also gave everyone involved a new perspective on how much work and how many considerations go into major decisions such as these.

Above it all, beyond the terrific amount of knowledge and experience provided throughout the week for all of us to learn from, I think one of the most valuable aspects—and one that has set Indiana apart via approaches such as this—is not only the open forum learning environment approach that lets our burgeoning professionals connect with each other, but the large number of attendees whose titles were only tangentially related to the strict, traditional titles of economic developers.

One of Indiana’s strengths the state is looking to hone is our interconnectedness. So many people across the state are passionate enough to want to educate themselves so that we are all prepared to support the growth and expansion of the state’s communities. Events such as Ball State University’s course not only prepare professional students through education, they also build bridges of communication and collaboration between professionals young and old that will be shaping the future of the state for years to come.

Ball State University
Building Better Communities
http://cms.bsu.edu/about/administrativeoffices/bbc

Ball State Economic Development Course

October 2015 Edition

IN-Person Report: My Experience at Ball State's Economic Development Course

by Stefan Barkow | Mar 11, 2015
In mid-January, I was in Muncie, Indiana attending a one-week intensive course at Ball State University with just over 80 other professionals. My fellow students included mayors, county commissioners, community developers, business representatives and others from across the state—and even a number from outside of Indiana.

In mid-January, I was in Muncie, Indiana attending a one-week intensive course at Ball State University with just over 80 other professionals. My fellow students included mayors, county commissioners, community developers, business representatives and others from across the state—and even a number from outside of Indiana.

The program was the “Indiana Economic Development Course,” organized and operated by Ball State’s Building Better Communities group. For five days we spent nearly eleven hours a day hearing from, talking to and working with experts and professionals. At the same time, daily rotating seating assignments encouraged us to build connections across communities and across states as we studied the latest trends, practices and innovations in the field of economic development.

This course is one of only a few like it offered in the United States, which is why there were students hailing from Ohio, Kentucky, Illinois and Tennessee present.

The course is offered annually and sees significant support from companies such as NIPSCO, which provide scholarships and grants. The one-week course is accredited by theInternational Economic Development Council and fulfills one of the prerequisites for those on the path to attaining the Certified Economic Developer (CEcD) designation.

Our days were broken into blocks in which we heard from and discussed every aspect of economic development with focuses on both small rural areas as well as major metropolitans.

Sessions included:

  • Economic development organization management
  • Professional ethics
  • Marketing and business attraction
  • Strategic planning
  • Profiling and analyzing local economies
  • Workforce development
  • Finance tools and strategies for economic development
  • Business retention and expansion
  • Community and neighborhood development
  • Site selection, presented by a professional site selector
  • Real estate development and reuse
  • Small business and entrepreneurship development

Although they were great about providing breaks so that we weren’t overwhelmed, even the provided lunches included presenters, including the Indiana Office of Community and Rural Affairs Director of Project Development Geoff Schomaker and Indiana Economic Development Corporation President Eric Doden discussing the proposed Regional Cities approach to economic development.

One day we were divided into teams of communities and companies and tasked with respectively attracting and selecting a site for an expanding business. This in itself was a flurry of adrenaline and activity, but also gave everyone involved a new perspective on how much work and how many considerations go into major decisions such as these.

Above it all, beyond the terrific amount of knowledge and experience provided throughout the week for all of us to learn from, I think one of the most valuable aspects—and one that has set Indiana apart via approaches such as this—is not only the open forum learning environment approach that lets our burgeoning professionals connect with each other, but the large number of attendees whose titles were only tangentially related to the strict, traditional titles of economic developers.

One of Indiana’s strengths the state is looking to hone is our interconnectedness. So many people across the state are passionate enough to want to educate themselves so that we are all prepared to support the growth and expansion of the state’s communities. Events such as Ball State University’s course not only prepare professional students through education, they also build bridges of communication and collaboration between professionals young and old that will be shaping the future of the state for years to come.

Ball State University
Building Better Communities
http://cms.bsu.edu/about/administrativeoffices/bbc

Ball State Economic Development Course

September 2015 Edition

IN-Person Report: My Experience at Ball State's Economic Development Course

by Stefan Barkow | Mar 11, 2015
In mid-January, I was in Muncie, Indiana attending a one-week intensive course at Ball State University with just over 80 other professionals. My fellow students included mayors, county commissioners, community developers, business representatives and others from across the state—and even a number from outside of Indiana.

In mid-January, I was in Muncie, Indiana attending a one-week intensive course at Ball State University with just over 80 other professionals. My fellow students included mayors, county commissioners, community developers, business representatives and others from across the state—and even a number from outside of Indiana.

The program was the “Indiana Economic Development Course,” organized and operated by Ball State’s Building Better Communities group. For five days we spent nearly eleven hours a day hearing from, talking to and working with experts and professionals. At the same time, daily rotating seating assignments encouraged us to build connections across communities and across states as we studied the latest trends, practices and innovations in the field of economic development.

This course is one of only a few like it offered in the United States, which is why there were students hailing from Ohio, Kentucky, Illinois and Tennessee present.

The course is offered annually and sees significant support from companies such as NIPSCO, which provide scholarships and grants. The one-week course is accredited by theInternational Economic Development Council and fulfills one of the prerequisites for those on the path to attaining the Certified Economic Developer (CEcD) designation.

Our days were broken into blocks in which we heard from and discussed every aspect of economic development with focuses on both small rural areas as well as major metropolitans.

Sessions included:

  • Economic development organization management
  • Professional ethics
  • Marketing and business attraction
  • Strategic planning
  • Profiling and analyzing local economies
  • Workforce development
  • Finance tools and strategies for economic development
  • Business retention and expansion
  • Community and neighborhood development
  • Site selection, presented by a professional site selector
  • Real estate development and reuse
  • Small business and entrepreneurship development

Although they were great about providing breaks so that we weren’t overwhelmed, even the provided lunches included presenters, including the Indiana Office of Community and Rural Affairs Director of Project Development Geoff Schomaker and Indiana Economic Development Corporation President Eric Doden discussing the proposed Regional Cities approach to economic development.

One day we were divided into teams of communities and companies and tasked with respectively attracting and selecting a site for an expanding business. This in itself was a flurry of adrenaline and activity, but also gave everyone involved a new perspective on how much work and how many considerations go into major decisions such as these.

Above it all, beyond the terrific amount of knowledge and experience provided throughout the week for all of us to learn from, I think one of the most valuable aspects—and one that has set Indiana apart via approaches such as this—is not only the open forum learning environment approach that lets our burgeoning professionals connect with each other, but the large number of attendees whose titles were only tangentially related to the strict, traditional titles of economic developers.

One of Indiana’s strengths the state is looking to hone is our interconnectedness. So many people across the state are passionate enough to want to educate themselves so that we are all prepared to support the growth and expansion of the state’s communities. Events such as Ball State University’s course not only prepare professional students through education, they also build bridges of communication and collaboration between professionals young and old that will be shaping the future of the state for years to come.

Ball State University
Building Better Communities
http://cms.bsu.edu/about/administrativeoffices/bbc

Ball State Economic Development Course

August 2015 Edition

IN-Person Report: My Experience at Ball State's Economic Development Course

by Stefan Barkow | Mar 11, 2015
In mid-January, I was in Muncie, Indiana attending a one-week intensive course at Ball State University with just over 80 other professionals. My fellow students included mayors, county commissioners, community developers, business representatives and others from across the state—and even a number from outside of Indiana.

In mid-January, I was in Muncie, Indiana attending a one-week intensive course at Ball State University with just over 80 other professionals. My fellow students included mayors, county commissioners, community developers, business representatives and others from across the state—and even a number from outside of Indiana.

The program was the “Indiana Economic Development Course,” organized and operated by Ball State’s Building Better Communities group. For five days we spent nearly eleven hours a day hearing from, talking to and working with experts and professionals. At the same time, daily rotating seating assignments encouraged us to build connections across communities and across states as we studied the latest trends, practices and innovations in the field of economic development.

This course is one of only a few like it offered in the United States, which is why there were students hailing from Ohio, Kentucky, Illinois and Tennessee present.

The course is offered annually and sees significant support from companies such as NIPSCO, which provide scholarships and grants. The one-week course is accredited by theInternational Economic Development Council and fulfills one of the prerequisites for those on the path to attaining the Certified Economic Developer (CEcD) designation.

Our days were broken into blocks in which we heard from and discussed every aspect of economic development with focuses on both small rural areas as well as major metropolitans.

Sessions included:

  • Economic development organization management
  • Professional ethics
  • Marketing and business attraction
  • Strategic planning
  • Profiling and analyzing local economies
  • Workforce development
  • Finance tools and strategies for economic development
  • Business retention and expansion
  • Community and neighborhood development
  • Site selection, presented by a professional site selector
  • Real estate development and reuse
  • Small business and entrepreneurship development

Although they were great about providing breaks so that we weren’t overwhelmed, even the provided lunches included presenters, including the Indiana Office of Community and Rural Affairs Director of Project Development Geoff Schomaker and Indiana Economic Development Corporation President Eric Doden discussing the proposed Regional Cities approach to economic development.

One day we were divided into teams of communities and companies and tasked with respectively attracting and selecting a site for an expanding business. This in itself was a flurry of adrenaline and activity, but also gave everyone involved a new perspective on how much work and how many considerations go into major decisions such as these.

Above it all, beyond the terrific amount of knowledge and experience provided throughout the week for all of us to learn from, I think one of the most valuable aspects—and one that has set Indiana apart via approaches such as this—is not only the open forum learning environment approach that lets our burgeoning professionals connect with each other, but the large number of attendees whose titles were only tangentially related to the strict, traditional titles of economic developers.

One of Indiana’s strengths the state is looking to hone is our interconnectedness. So many people across the state are passionate enough to want to educate themselves so that we are all prepared to support the growth and expansion of the state’s communities. Events such as Ball State University’s course not only prepare professional students through education, they also build bridges of communication and collaboration between professionals young and old that will be shaping the future of the state for years to come.

Ball State University
Building Better Communities
http://cms.bsu.edu/about/administrativeoffices/bbc

Ball State Economic Development Course

July 2015 Edition

IN-Person Report: My Experience at Ball State's Economic Development Course

by Stefan Barkow | Mar 11, 2015
In mid-January, I was in Muncie, Indiana attending a one-week intensive course at Ball State University with just over 80 other professionals. My fellow students included mayors, county commissioners, community developers, business representatives and others from across the state—and even a number from outside of Indiana.

In mid-January, I was in Muncie, Indiana attending a one-week intensive course at Ball State University with just over 80 other professionals. My fellow students included mayors, county commissioners, community developers, business representatives and others from across the state—and even a number from outside of Indiana.

The program was the “Indiana Economic Development Course,” organized and operated by Ball State’s Building Better Communities group. For five days we spent nearly eleven hours a day hearing from, talking to and working with experts and professionals. At the same time, daily rotating seating assignments encouraged us to build connections across communities and across states as we studied the latest trends, practices and innovations in the field of economic development.

This course is one of only a few like it offered in the United States, which is why there were students hailing from Ohio, Kentucky, Illinois and Tennessee present.

The course is offered annually and sees significant support from companies such as NIPSCO, which provide scholarships and grants. The one-week course is accredited by theInternational Economic Development Council and fulfills one of the prerequisites for those on the path to attaining the Certified Economic Developer (CEcD) designation.

Our days were broken into blocks in which we heard from and discussed every aspect of economic development with focuses on both small rural areas as well as major metropolitans.

Sessions included:

  • Economic development organization management
  • Professional ethics
  • Marketing and business attraction
  • Strategic planning
  • Profiling and analyzing local economies
  • Workforce development
  • Finance tools and strategies for economic development
  • Business retention and expansion
  • Community and neighborhood development
  • Site selection, presented by a professional site selector
  • Real estate development and reuse
  • Small business and entrepreneurship development

Although they were great about providing breaks so that we weren’t overwhelmed, even the provided lunches included presenters, including the Indiana Office of Community and Rural Affairs Director of Project Development Geoff Schomaker and Indiana Economic Development Corporation President Eric Doden discussing the proposed Regional Cities approach to economic development.

One day we were divided into teams of communities and companies and tasked with respectively attracting and selecting a site for an expanding business. This in itself was a flurry of adrenaline and activity, but also gave everyone involved a new perspective on how much work and how many considerations go into major decisions such as these.

Above it all, beyond the terrific amount of knowledge and experience provided throughout the week for all of us to learn from, I think one of the most valuable aspects—and one that has set Indiana apart via approaches such as this—is not only the open forum learning environment approach that lets our burgeoning professionals connect with each other, but the large number of attendees whose titles were only tangentially related to the strict, traditional titles of economic developers.

One of Indiana’s strengths the state is looking to hone is our interconnectedness. So many people across the state are passionate enough to want to educate themselves so that we are all prepared to support the growth and expansion of the state’s communities. Events such as Ball State University’s course not only prepare professional students through education, they also build bridges of communication and collaboration between professionals young and old that will be shaping the future of the state for years to come.

Ball State University
Building Better Communities
http://cms.bsu.edu/about/administrativeoffices/bbc

Ball State Economic Development Course

June 2015 Edition

IN-Person Report: My Experience at Ball State's Economic Development Course

by Stefan Barkow | Mar 11, 2015
In mid-January, I was in Muncie, Indiana attending a one-week intensive course at Ball State University with just over 80 other professionals. My fellow students included mayors, county commissioners, community developers, business representatives and others from across the state—and even a number from outside of Indiana.

In mid-January, I was in Muncie, Indiana attending a one-week intensive course at Ball State University with just over 80 other professionals. My fellow students included mayors, county commissioners, community developers, business representatives and others from across the state—and even a number from outside of Indiana.

The program was the “Indiana Economic Development Course,” organized and operated by Ball State’s Building Better Communities group. For five days we spent nearly eleven hours a day hearing from, talking to and working with experts and professionals. At the same time, daily rotating seating assignments encouraged us to build connections across communities and across states as we studied the latest trends, practices and innovations in the field of economic development.

This course is one of only a few like it offered in the United States, which is why there were students hailing from Ohio, Kentucky, Illinois and Tennessee present.

The course is offered annually and sees significant support from companies such as NIPSCO, which provide scholarships and grants. The one-week course is accredited by theInternational Economic Development Council and fulfills one of the prerequisites for those on the path to attaining the Certified Economic Developer (CEcD) designation.

Our days were broken into blocks in which we heard from and discussed every aspect of economic development with focuses on both small rural areas as well as major metropolitans.

Sessions included:

  • Economic development organization management
  • Professional ethics
  • Marketing and business attraction
  • Strategic planning
  • Profiling and analyzing local economies
  • Workforce development
  • Finance tools and strategies for economic development
  • Business retention and expansion
  • Community and neighborhood development
  • Site selection, presented by a professional site selector
  • Real estate development and reuse
  • Small business and entrepreneurship development

Although they were great about providing breaks so that we weren’t overwhelmed, even the provided lunches included presenters, including the Indiana Office of Community and Rural Affairs Director of Project Development Geoff Schomaker and Indiana Economic Development Corporation President Eric Doden discussing the proposed Regional Cities approach to economic development.

One day we were divided into teams of communities and companies and tasked with respectively attracting and selecting a site for an expanding business. This in itself was a flurry of adrenaline and activity, but also gave everyone involved a new perspective on how much work and how many considerations go into major decisions such as these.

Above it all, beyond the terrific amount of knowledge and experience provided throughout the week for all of us to learn from, I think one of the most valuable aspects—and one that has set Indiana apart via approaches such as this—is not only the open forum learning environment approach that lets our burgeoning professionals connect with each other, but the large number of attendees whose titles were only tangentially related to the strict, traditional titles of economic developers.

One of Indiana’s strengths the state is looking to hone is our interconnectedness. So many people across the state are passionate enough to want to educate themselves so that we are all prepared to support the growth and expansion of the state’s communities. Events such as Ball State University’s course not only prepare professional students through education, they also build bridges of communication and collaboration between professionals young and old that will be shaping the future of the state for years to come.

Ball State University
Building Better Communities
http://cms.bsu.edu/about/administrativeoffices/bbc

Ball State Economic Development Course

May 2015 Edition

IN-Person Report: My Experience at Ball State's Economic Development Course

by Stefan Barkow | Mar 11, 2015
In mid-January, I was in Muncie, Indiana attending a one-week intensive course at Ball State University with just over 80 other professionals. My fellow students included mayors, county commissioners, community developers, business representatives and others from across the state—and even a number from outside of Indiana.

In mid-January, I was in Muncie, Indiana attending a one-week intensive course at Ball State University with just over 80 other professionals. My fellow students included mayors, county commissioners, community developers, business representatives and others from across the state—and even a number from outside of Indiana.

The program was the “Indiana Economic Development Course,” organized and operated by Ball State’s Building Better Communities group. For five days we spent nearly eleven hours a day hearing from, talking to and working with experts and professionals. At the same time, daily rotating seating assignments encouraged us to build connections across communities and across states as we studied the latest trends, practices and innovations in the field of economic development.

This course is one of only a few like it offered in the United States, which is why there were students hailing from Ohio, Kentucky, Illinois and Tennessee present.

The course is offered annually and sees significant support from companies such as NIPSCO, which provide scholarships and grants. The one-week course is accredited by theInternational Economic Development Council and fulfills one of the prerequisites for those on the path to attaining the Certified Economic Developer (CEcD) designation.

Our days were broken into blocks in which we heard from and discussed every aspect of economic development with focuses on both small rural areas as well as major metropolitans.

Sessions included:

  • Economic development organization management
  • Professional ethics
  • Marketing and business attraction
  • Strategic planning
  • Profiling and analyzing local economies
  • Workforce development
  • Finance tools and strategies for economic development
  • Business retention and expansion
  • Community and neighborhood development
  • Site selection, presented by a professional site selector
  • Real estate development and reuse
  • Small business and entrepreneurship development

Although they were great about providing breaks so that we weren’t overwhelmed, even the provided lunches included presenters, including the Indiana Office of Community and Rural Affairs Director of Project Development Geoff Schomaker and Indiana Economic Development Corporation President Eric Doden discussing the proposed Regional Cities approach to economic development.

One day we were divided into teams of communities and companies and tasked with respectively attracting and selecting a site for an expanding business. This in itself was a flurry of adrenaline and activity, but also gave everyone involved a new perspective on how much work and how many considerations go into major decisions such as these.

Above it all, beyond the terrific amount of knowledge and experience provided throughout the week for all of us to learn from, I think one of the most valuable aspects—and one that has set Indiana apart via approaches such as this—is not only the open forum learning environment approach that lets our burgeoning professionals connect with each other, but the large number of attendees whose titles were only tangentially related to the strict, traditional titles of economic developers.

One of Indiana’s strengths the state is looking to hone is our interconnectedness. So many people across the state are passionate enough to want to educate themselves so that we are all prepared to support the growth and expansion of the state’s communities. Events such as Ball State University’s course not only prepare professional students through education, they also build bridges of communication and collaboration between professionals young and old that will be shaping the future of the state for years to come.

Ball State University
Building Better Communities
http://cms.bsu.edu/about/administrativeoffices/bbc

Ball State Economic Development Course

April 2015 Edition

IN-Person Report: My Experience at Ball State's Economic Development Course

by Stefan Barkow | Mar 11, 2015
In mid-January, I was in Muncie, Indiana attending a one-week intensive course at Ball State University with just over 80 other professionals. My fellow students included mayors, county commissioners, community developers, business representatives and others from across the state—and even a number from outside of Indiana.

In mid-January, I was in Muncie, Indiana attending a one-week intensive course at Ball State University with just over 80 other professionals. My fellow students included mayors, county commissioners, community developers, business representatives and others from across the state—and even a number from outside of Indiana.

The program was the “Indiana Economic Development Course,” organized and operated by Ball State’s Building Better Communities group. For five days we spent nearly eleven hours a day hearing from, talking to and working with experts and professionals. At the same time, daily rotating seating assignments encouraged us to build connections across communities and across states as we studied the latest trends, practices and innovations in the field of economic development.

This course is one of only a few like it offered in the United States, which is why there were students hailing from Ohio, Kentucky, Illinois and Tennessee present.

The course is offered annually and sees significant support from companies such as NIPSCO, which provide scholarships and grants. The one-week course is accredited by theInternational Economic Development Council and fulfills one of the prerequisites for those on the path to attaining the Certified Economic Developer (CEcD) designation.

Our days were broken into blocks in which we heard from and discussed every aspect of economic development with focuses on both small rural areas as well as major metropolitans.

Sessions included:

  • Economic development organization management
  • Professional ethics
  • Marketing and business attraction
  • Strategic planning
  • Profiling and analyzing local economies
  • Workforce development
  • Finance tools and strategies for economic development
  • Business retention and expansion
  • Community and neighborhood development
  • Site selection, presented by a professional site selector
  • Real estate development and reuse
  • Small business and entrepreneurship development

Although they were great about providing breaks so that we weren’t overwhelmed, even the provided lunches included presenters, including the Indiana Office of Community and Rural Affairs Director of Project Development Geoff Schomaker and Indiana Economic Development Corporation President Eric Doden discussing the proposed Regional Cities approach to economic development.

One day we were divided into teams of communities and companies and tasked with respectively attracting and selecting a site for an expanding business. This in itself was a flurry of adrenaline and activity, but also gave everyone involved a new perspective on how much work and how many considerations go into major decisions such as these.

Above it all, beyond the terrific amount of knowledge and experience provided throughout the week for all of us to learn from, I think one of the most valuable aspects—and one that has set Indiana apart via approaches such as this—is not only the open forum learning environment approach that lets our burgeoning professionals connect with each other, but the large number of attendees whose titles were only tangentially related to the strict, traditional titles of economic developers.

One of Indiana’s strengths the state is looking to hone is our interconnectedness. So many people across the state are passionate enough to want to educate themselves so that we are all prepared to support the growth and expansion of the state’s communities. Events such as Ball State University’s course not only prepare professional students through education, they also build bridges of communication and collaboration between professionals young and old that will be shaping the future of the state for years to come.

Ball State University
Building Better Communities
http://cms.bsu.edu/about/administrativeoffices/bbc

Ball State Economic Development Course

March 2015 Edition

IN-Person Report: My Experience at Ball State's Economic Development Course

by Stefan Barkow | Mar 11, 2015
In mid-January, I was in Muncie, Indiana attending a one-week intensive course at Ball State University with just over 80 other professionals. My fellow students included mayors, county commissioners, community developers, business representatives and others from across the state—and even a number from outside of Indiana.

In mid-January, I was in Muncie, Indiana attending a one-week intensive course at Ball State University with just over 80 other professionals. My fellow students included mayors, county commissioners, community developers, business representatives and others from across the state—and even a number from outside of Indiana.

The program was the “Indiana Economic Development Course,” organized and operated by Ball State’s Building Better Communities group. For five days we spent nearly eleven hours a day hearing from, talking to and working with experts and professionals. At the same time, daily rotating seating assignments encouraged us to build connections across communities and across states as we studied the latest trends, practices and innovations in the field of economic development.

This course is one of only a few like it offered in the United States, which is why there were students hailing from Ohio, Kentucky, Illinois and Tennessee present.

The course is offered annually and sees significant support from companies such as NIPSCO, which provide scholarships and grants. The one-week course is accredited by theInternational Economic Development Council and fulfills one of the prerequisites for those on the path to attaining the Certified Economic Developer (CEcD) designation.

Our days were broken into blocks in which we heard from and discussed every aspect of economic development with focuses on both small rural areas as well as major metropolitans.

Sessions included:

  • Economic development organization management
  • Professional ethics
  • Marketing and business attraction
  • Strategic planning
  • Profiling and analyzing local economies
  • Workforce development
  • Finance tools and strategies for economic development
  • Business retention and expansion
  • Community and neighborhood development
  • Site selection, presented by a professional site selector
  • Real estate development and reuse
  • Small business and entrepreneurship development

Although they were great about providing breaks so that we weren’t overwhelmed, even the provided lunches included presenters, including the Indiana Office of Community and Rural Affairs Director of Project Development Geoff Schomaker and Indiana Economic Development Corporation President Eric Doden discussing the proposed Regional Cities approach to economic development.

One day we were divided into teams of communities and companies and tasked with respectively attracting and selecting a site for an expanding business. This in itself was a flurry of adrenaline and activity, but also gave everyone involved a new perspective on how much work and how many considerations go into major decisions such as these.

Above it all, beyond the terrific amount of knowledge and experience provided throughout the week for all of us to learn from, I think one of the most valuable aspects—and one that has set Indiana apart via approaches such as this—is not only the open forum learning environment approach that lets our burgeoning professionals connect with each other, but the large number of attendees whose titles were only tangentially related to the strict, traditional titles of economic developers.

One of Indiana’s strengths the state is looking to hone is our interconnectedness. So many people across the state are passionate enough to want to educate themselves so that we are all prepared to support the growth and expansion of the state’s communities. Events such as Ball State University’s course not only prepare professional students through education, they also build bridges of communication and collaboration between professionals young and old that will be shaping the future of the state for years to come.

Ball State University
Building Better Communities
http://cms.bsu.edu/about/administrativeoffices/bbc

Ball State Economic Development Course

February 2015 Edition

IN-Person Report: My Experience at Ball State's Economic Development Course

by Stefan Barkow | Mar 11, 2015
In mid-January, I was in Muncie, Indiana attending a one-week intensive course at Ball State University with just over 80 other professionals. My fellow students included mayors, county commissioners, community developers, business representatives and others from across the state—and even a number from outside of Indiana.

In mid-January, I was in Muncie, Indiana attending a one-week intensive course at Ball State University with just over 80 other professionals. My fellow students included mayors, county commissioners, community developers, business representatives and others from across the state—and even a number from outside of Indiana.

The program was the “Indiana Economic Development Course,” organized and operated by Ball State’s Building Better Communities group. For five days we spent nearly eleven hours a day hearing from, talking to and working with experts and professionals. At the same time, daily rotating seating assignments encouraged us to build connections across communities and across states as we studied the latest trends, practices and innovations in the field of economic development.

This course is one of only a few like it offered in the United States, which is why there were students hailing from Ohio, Kentucky, Illinois and Tennessee present.

The course is offered annually and sees significant support from companies such as NIPSCO, which provide scholarships and grants. The one-week course is accredited by theInternational Economic Development Council and fulfills one of the prerequisites for those on the path to attaining the Certified Economic Developer (CEcD) designation.

Our days were broken into blocks in which we heard from and discussed every aspect of economic development with focuses on both small rural areas as well as major metropolitans.

Sessions included:

  • Economic development organization management
  • Professional ethics
  • Marketing and business attraction
  • Strategic planning
  • Profiling and analyzing local economies
  • Workforce development
  • Finance tools and strategies for economic development
  • Business retention and expansion
  • Community and neighborhood development
  • Site selection, presented by a professional site selector
  • Real estate development and reuse
  • Small business and entrepreneurship development

Although they were great about providing breaks so that we weren’t overwhelmed, even the provided lunches included presenters, including the Indiana Office of Community and Rural Affairs Director of Project Development Geoff Schomaker and Indiana Economic Development Corporation President Eric Doden discussing the proposed Regional Cities approach to economic development.

One day we were divided into teams of communities and companies and tasked with respectively attracting and selecting a site for an expanding business. This in itself was a flurry of adrenaline and activity, but also gave everyone involved a new perspective on how much work and how many considerations go into major decisions such as these.

Above it all, beyond the terrific amount of knowledge and experience provided throughout the week for all of us to learn from, I think one of the most valuable aspects—and one that has set Indiana apart via approaches such as this—is not only the open forum learning environment approach that lets our burgeoning professionals connect with each other, but the large number of attendees whose titles were only tangentially related to the strict, traditional titles of economic developers.

One of Indiana’s strengths the state is looking to hone is our interconnectedness. So many people across the state are passionate enough to want to educate themselves so that we are all prepared to support the growth and expansion of the state’s communities. Events such as Ball State University’s course not only prepare professional students through education, they also build bridges of communication and collaboration between professionals young and old that will be shaping the future of the state for years to come.

Ball State University
Building Better Communities
http://cms.bsu.edu/about/administrativeoffices/bbc

Ball State Economic Development Course

December 2014 Edition

IN-Person Report: My Experience at Ball State's Economic Development Course

by Stefan Barkow | Mar 11, 2015
In mid-January, I was in Muncie, Indiana attending a one-week intensive course at Ball State University with just over 80 other professionals. My fellow students included mayors, county commissioners, community developers, business representatives and others from across the state—and even a number from outside of Indiana.

In mid-January, I was in Muncie, Indiana attending a one-week intensive course at Ball State University with just over 80 other professionals. My fellow students included mayors, county commissioners, community developers, business representatives and others from across the state—and even a number from outside of Indiana.

The program was the “Indiana Economic Development Course,” organized and operated by Ball State’s Building Better Communities group. For five days we spent nearly eleven hours a day hearing from, talking to and working with experts and professionals. At the same time, daily rotating seating assignments encouraged us to build connections across communities and across states as we studied the latest trends, practices and innovations in the field of economic development.

This course is one of only a few like it offered in the United States, which is why there were students hailing from Ohio, Kentucky, Illinois and Tennessee present.

The course is offered annually and sees significant support from companies such as NIPSCO, which provide scholarships and grants. The one-week course is accredited by theInternational Economic Development Council and fulfills one of the prerequisites for those on the path to attaining the Certified Economic Developer (CEcD) designation.

Our days were broken into blocks in which we heard from and discussed every aspect of economic development with focuses on both small rural areas as well as major metropolitans.

Sessions included:

  • Economic development organization management
  • Professional ethics
  • Marketing and business attraction
  • Strategic planning
  • Profiling and analyzing local economies
  • Workforce development
  • Finance tools and strategies for economic development
  • Business retention and expansion
  • Community and neighborhood development
  • Site selection, presented by a professional site selector
  • Real estate development and reuse
  • Small business and entrepreneurship development

Although they were great about providing breaks so that we weren’t overwhelmed, even the provided lunches included presenters, including the Indiana Office of Community and Rural Affairs Director of Project Development Geoff Schomaker and Indiana Economic Development Corporation President Eric Doden discussing the proposed Regional Cities approach to economic development.

One day we were divided into teams of communities and companies and tasked with respectively attracting and selecting a site for an expanding business. This in itself was a flurry of adrenaline and activity, but also gave everyone involved a new perspective on how much work and how many considerations go into major decisions such as these.

Above it all, beyond the terrific amount of knowledge and experience provided throughout the week for all of us to learn from, I think one of the most valuable aspects—and one that has set Indiana apart via approaches such as this—is not only the open forum learning environment approach that lets our burgeoning professionals connect with each other, but the large number of attendees whose titles were only tangentially related to the strict, traditional titles of economic developers.

One of Indiana’s strengths the state is looking to hone is our interconnectedness. So many people across the state are passionate enough to want to educate themselves so that we are all prepared to support the growth and expansion of the state’s communities. Events such as Ball State University’s course not only prepare professional students through education, they also build bridges of communication and collaboration between professionals young and old that will be shaping the future of the state for years to come.

Ball State University
Building Better Communities
http://cms.bsu.edu/about/administrativeoffices/bbc

Ball State Economic Development Course